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Posted by: archaeologymatters ( )
Date: July 15, 2012 02:18AM

Does anyone know the details about this?

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Posted by: enoughenoch19 ( )
Date: July 15, 2012 03:22AM

THis may have been where he had fake money printed and put into circulation. That would be fraud, but he did so many unlawful things, it could be one of the other times. He was a career criminal.

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Posted by: RPackham ( )
Date: July 15, 2012 10:04AM

enoughenoch19 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> THis may have been where he had fake money printed and put into circulation. That would be fraud, but he did so many unlawful things, it could be one of the other times. He was a career criminal.

Let me suggest that this is the kind of wild statement that gives exmormons a bad name and confirms TBM beliefs that our information is just "lies and distortions."

The 1826 court hearing was for "glass-looking". JS was charged with being a "disorderly person" because of his treasure-seeking using magic. It was not a formal trial, but a kind of preliminary hearing. It is not clear from the record that he was "convicted," although it appears that the was guilty. He was given "leg bail," which seems to mean that he was simply told to get out of town and not come back.

PLEASE don't overstate your case! The carefully stated, unexaggerated truth is enough.

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Posted by: thingsithink ( )
Date: July 15, 2012 10:10AM

Richard,

Respectfully, enoughenoch19 may not have phrased his statement in a manner most likely to persuade active Mormons to take a second look at their beliefs, but his statement is sound and supported by the facts.

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Posted by: kimball ( )
Date: July 15, 2012 02:44PM

Are you all confusing 1826 with 1836? The 1826 trial was about glass-looking alone, and until you present it, I have never found any evidence to suggest otherwise.

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Posted by: Fetal Deity ( )
Date: July 15, 2012 12:16PM

"'Oliver Cowdery went to Philadelphia for plates to print bank notes, and Orson Hyde went to the legislature in Columbus with a petition for a bank license. It was refused. Oliver returned with plates for the Kirtland Safety Society Bank, but Orson Hyde came back without a charter. The plates were so expensive that they printed some specie anyway, writing in "Anti" before the word "Bank" and "ing" after it. The notes read, "Kirtland Safety Society Anti-Banking Company," and the paper passed as legal tender from a joint-stock company.'"
...
"'Joseph and Sidney Rigdon were tried in court for violating the law, were found guilty and fined $1,000. They appealed on the grounds that the institution was an association and not a bank; the plea was never ruled upon as the bank suspended payments and closed its doors.'"

http://www.utlm.org/onlineresources/josephsmithsbank.htm


Although perhaps not technically fraudulent in the strict legal sense, Joseph Smith's actions in this specific instance, in my view, were shady at best.

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Posted by: 3X ( )
Date: July 15, 2012 12:57PM

Lately I've been seeing (in reader's comments hither and yon) characterizations of Mr. Smith as a "horse thief".

While I do like the sound of it, I assume that he was never charged with such?

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