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Posted by: pathdocmd ( )
Date: December 02, 2011 09:17PM

The Morg's racism makes my blood boil, so I feel inspired today that I need to share a message about blood.

The LDS Hospital wouldn't use Red Cross Blood until the late 1990's. This all started because it might be contaminated with black blood. Yes, it is true!

Since Brigham said that one drop of blood from the seed of Cain was enough to disqualify a man from the priesthood, this drastic step was absolutely necessary.

Up until at least the late 1950's LDS Hospital openly marketed themselves in Utah has having a blood suply free of negro blood. They drew blood from local donors who would attest that their family tree was free of the cursed blood. Many Utah Mormons would go only to LDS hospital because of this.

The LDS Hospital became privatized in the early 1970's, and from then on had no "official" connection to the church. The Morg actually only bank-rolled a not-for-profit company (IHC) to take things over so they wouldn’t get sued in medical malpractice cases.

The men who were "called" to make this privatization happen were exactly that, "called". It was a church calling with no compensation. The brother called of God to spearhead this effort was a good-hearted (no, seriously) millionaire. He is now is in his early 80's and is a sealer in the Bountiful temple. By the time he left, he and others had built up the IHC monopoly to include 34 hospitals and its own health insurance company. The health insurance part of the business made it so they could just transfer money from one had to the other every time someone got sick.

Although it was no longer openly stated why, IHC continued to collect their own blood for the Mormon hospitals. In the late 1990's the IHC blood supply operation was slapped by the FDA and told to stop all of their blood collection. IHC had not been complying with all of the required protocols to test blood for HIV. After all, they didn't need to, right? It was coming from righteous people. (I'm just saying.)

I was working/training in the laboratory department at LDS hospital when this happened. The head of the blood program was my professor, and I know he caught hell when this happened. They had to start getting blood from the Red Cross. The blood donors were forced to trade cookies for curses of cain, oh my! What a blow to the sacred priesthood. Of course, they kept this whole embarrassing thing as quiet as possible.

How do we apply this message to our daily lives? Hug a black friend and tell them you hope you both get to get to kick Brigham’s pasty white resurrected a** in the next life.

In closing, I just want to bear my testimony to all of you that if you didn't receive an answer to a priesthood blessing, it wasn't because of your lack of faith. It was because there was some cursed blood running through those hands on your head.

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Posted by: GNPE ( )
Date: December 02, 2011 09:28PM

When it comes to application of the non-basic aspects of 'the gospel', Mormonism.Fails.on.all.cylinders.

We Know what would happen if ChurchCo went to

Kindness
Honesty
Charity
Marital Fidelity
Patience

don't we?

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Posted by: utahmonomore ( )
Date: December 03, 2011 12:34AM

And THIS ladies and gentlemen is one more reason that I dont want anything to do with the cultish and childish BS and just downright wrongdoings and dealing with the LD$.

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Posted by: anagrammy ( )
Date: December 02, 2011 09:40PM

I had black hair and not-fair skin, and I must admit I did play with the guy.

"Oh, you must mean my grandmother's father--he was a Stevenson from that island off the coast of Columbia, the one with all the blacks. You think he might have had Negro blood?

The guy gasped with horror and croaked the name of the island (which I forget).

It was my last visit-- no loss to me, I was kind of wondering how I could gracefully exit and they handed me a perfect out.


Anagrammy who became whiter and whiter and then apostacized and got darker and darker and happier and happier.

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Posted by: adoylelb ( )
Date: December 02, 2011 09:52PM

I got dirty looks in RS when I said I couldn't participate in the stake's blood drive as I had already donated a few weeks earlier at the university I attended at the time. The thing is that both blood drives were sponsored by the Red Cross, so I think they were just upset that I didn't donate through the church.

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Posted by: intellectualfeminist ( )
Date: December 02, 2011 11:02PM

OMG.......thanks for posting this, pathdocmd. I've seen a lot of dirty, disgusting Mormon secrets come out from under the rug on this site, but this is a new low, even for them. Trying to wrap my head around the fact that they continued this up to the LATE 1990's........huge sigh of relief that I officially resigned and left the taint and stench of this cult .
Geez........

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Posted by: flyboy ( )
Date: December 02, 2011 11:49PM

Wouldn't it be funny to ask Mitt about this at a news conference?

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Posted by: Mia ( )
Date: December 02, 2011 11:53PM

If true, this should be picked up by the media.

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Posted by: Ex-CultMember ( )
Date: December 03, 2011 12:07AM

What people fail to realize is that there was much more racist history with the Mormon church than just denying blacks the priesthood. This is just one example.

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Posted by: JoD3:360 ( )
Date: December 03, 2011 12:18AM

http://www.affirmation.org/against_marriage_equality/prelude.shtml#utah

In 1953, a First Presidency secretary also informed a white Mormon about the less-obvious extent of Utah's racial segregation: "The L.D.S. Hospital here in Salt Lake City has a blood bank which does not contain any colored blood."106 According to presidency counselor J. Reuben Clark, this policy of segregating African-American blood from the blood donated by so-called "white people" was intended "to protect the purity of the blood streams of the people of this Church."107


107. J. Reuben Clark to Dr. G. Albin Matson (director of Blood Grouping Laboratory, Department of Bacteriology, University of Utah), 12 April 1948, folder 1, box 378, Clark papers; also quoted in Quinn, Extensions of Power, 839. For the background of this blood-segregation, see D. Michael Quinn, J. Reuben Clark: The Church Years (Provo: Brigham Young Univ. Press, 1983), 229-32.

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Posted by: apfvrf ( )
Date: December 03, 2011 12:32AM

Folks:

Blood separation was common in most hospitals up until the mid
1970's. The Mormon Church is guilty of lots of things but in this case, they were in lock step with the rest of the land.

I wish they would have led but alas, they didn't. They never
do.

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Posted by: bignevermo ( )
Date: December 03, 2011 11:58AM

just sayin
got any soureces for your assertion?

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Posted by: bona dea ( )
Date: December 03, 2011 12:40PM

I. m not sure about the dates, but up until the civil rights ovement, that was common.I'm pretty sure it was done until the 50s or 60s.

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Posted by: summer ( )
Date: December 03, 2011 12:56AM

Thanks for sharing it. So the hospitals were worried about African-American blood but not worried about transmitting HIV through blood supplies. Lovely.

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Posted by: no-mo-mo ( )
Date: December 03, 2011 12:57AM

It doesn't matter how silly their rationale was, they have a right to use their own blood as long as they follow FDA safety parameters, which they failed to do unfortunately. A lot of individuals also bank their own blood for future use, especially if they have atypical blood types. In fact, the rationale is irrelevant, since they weren't singling out any specific individuals but just not using Red Cross blood as a whole -- which includes blood from every kind of donor.

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Posted by: goldenrule ( )
Date: December 03, 2011 01:13PM

The right of them to use whatever blood they want is beside the point. No one said they didn't have that right regardless of the rationale.

It's the fact they didn't want "negro blood" because of their ignorance and racism that is outrageous and morally unacceptable. That is really what is at issue. Who cares if they have/had the right. Doesn't mean they should have done it.

That has always been one of my biggest issues, even as a TBM...shouldn't the one true church led by a modern prophet be at the forefront of progressing society? Instead they have to be drug kicking and screaming like a petulant child into the current century.

And up until the 90s?!?! Jesus I'm SO glad to be out!!!

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Posted by: steve benson ( )
Date: December 03, 2011 04:11AM

Excommunicated Mormon historian D. Michael Quinn (who was ostensibly stripped of his LDS membership for publicly exposing, reporting and publishing a history of the Mormon Church's pattern of ongoing lies, practices and cover-ups relating to post-Manifesto polygamy) offers a devastating timeline review of the bigoted, discriminatory and anti-civil rights actions and attitudes of the Utah Mormon Church designed to control and restrict the exercise of equal human rights by African-Americans within Utah's (and more specifically, Salt Lake City's) boundaries.

In his excerpted analysis below, Quinn also makes note of the Mormon Church's equally reprehensible and similarly-bigoted history of teachings and practices towards gays and lesbians.

(Note: Short repetitions periodically appear in the reproduced text that follows, given that some points are also reiterated in photograph sublines that accompany Quinn's article):


"Utah Mormon Discrimination Against Blacks

"Even after federal emancipation of America's slaves in the 1860s, LDS church president Brigham Young referred to African-American slavery as a religious necessity. Earlier, as both church president and governor, he had instructed the Utah legislature in 1852 to legalize the slavery of African-Americans. This directly contradicted Joseph Smith's proposal in 1844 'to abolish slavery by the year 1850' by financially compensating Southern slave-owners through the sale of federal lands in the West. Utah Mormonism's reversal of Joseph Smith's social policy toward Negroes was mirrored by the refusal of LDS presidents after 1844 to follow the founding prophet's example of giving the priesthood to blacks who were not slaves.

"For more than a century, Utah restricted African-Americans from patronizing white restaurants and hotels, prohibited them from public swimming pools, and required them to sit in the balconies of theaters. During World War II, African-Americans wearing their nation's uniform had to sit in the balcony of Utah theaters, while German prisoners-of-war sat on the main floor with white servicemen and civilians. Utah law also prohibited marriage between a white person and a black (including persons only one-eighth Negro).

"Utah's racial discrimination did not occur by happenstance nor did it continue into modern times by accident. It was promoted by the highest leaders of the state's dominant church. As late as 1941, Counselor J. Reuben Clark used the word [rhymes with 'trigger'] in his First Presidency office diary. In 1944, the First Presidency authorized local LDS leaders to join 'as individuals a civic organization whose purpose is to restrict and control negro settlement' in Salt Lake City. A year later, LDS president George Albert Smith wrote: 'Talked to Pres Clark & Nicholas [G. Smith, an Assistant to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles] about the use of [LDS] meeting houses for meetings to prevent Negroes from becoming neighbors.' The church president's diary did not indicate whether he endorsed or opposed this activity, but his brother Nicholas G. Smith described it as 'race hatred.'

"In 1947, when discussing the site of the future Los Angeles temple, First Presidency Counselor J. Reuben Clark asked the LDS church's attorney in that area 'to purchase as much of that property as we can in order to control the colored situation.'

"In 1947, the First Presidency wrote that 'the intermarriage of the Negro and White races, [is] a concept which has heretofore been most repugnant to most normal-minded people from the ancient patriarchs till now.'

"In 1953, a First Presidency secretary informed a white Mormon that 'The L.D.S. Hospital here in Salt Lake City has a blood bank which does not contain any colored blood.' According to presidency counselor J. Reuben Clark, this policy of segregating African-American blood from the blood donated by so-called 'white people' was intended 'to protect the purity of the blood streams of the people of this Church.'

"During this era of Utah's racial segregation, the First Presidency also repeatedly affirmed that no African-American could stay at the LDS church-owned Hotel Utah (which had maintained this exclusion since its opening in 1911). The LDS president was president of the hotel, and his counselors were its senior vice-presidents. The First Presidency explained this racial exclusion as simply 'the practice of the hotel.'

"When internationally renown singer Marian Anderson returned in March 1948 to participate in a concert at the LDS church's Salt Lake Tabernacle, the First Presidency relented. America's beloved contralto 'was allowed to stay at the Hotel Utah on condition that she use the freight elevator.' This world-famous black woman was not allowed to use the main entrance and lobby.

"Making specific reference to the desegregation controversy in Little Rock, Arkansas, Counselor Clark in 1957 instructed Belle Smith Spafford 'that she should do what she could to keep the National Council [of Women] from going on record in favor of what in the last analysis would be regarded as negro equality.'

"In 1965 and 1967, Apostle Ezra Taft Benson stated in televised meetings on Temple Square in Salt Lake City that 'the so-called civil rights movement as it exists today is a Communist program for revolution in America.'

"In 1963, Apostle Joseph Fielding Smith told 'Look' magazine's editor: '"Darkies" are wonderful people, and they have their place in our Church.'

"In 1967, Apostle Benson also approved the use of one of his talks as the forward to the overtly racist book 'Black Hammer,' which featured the decapitated (and profusely bleeding) head of an African-American male on its cover.

"President Smith's counselors soon extended their support of racial segregation to states beyond Utah. In 1947, when discussing the site of the future Los Angeles temple, Counselor Clark asked the LDS church's attorney in that area 'to purchase as much of that property as we can in order to control the colored situation.' A month later, during the meeting of the First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in the Salt Lake Temple, 'President Clark called attention to the sentiment among many people in this country to the point that we should break down all racial lines, [and] as a result of which sentiment negro people have acquired an assertiveness that they never before possessed and in some cases have become impudent.'

"In 1949, while criticizing the legislative efforts in Arizona to 'guarantee rights of Negroes,' LDS presidency counselor David O. McKay said, 'The South knows how to handle them and they do not have any trouble, and the colored people are better off down there--[but] in California they are becoming very progressive and insolent in many cases.' Likewise, in 1950 Counselor Clark wrote: 'Race tolerance: the trend is just terrible.'

"There was no mystery about why Utah law continued to prohibit interracial marriage. In 1947, the First Presidency wrote that 'the intermarriage of the Negro and White races, [is] a concept which has heretofore been most repugnant to most normal-minded people from the ancient patriarchs till now.' In other words, the First Presidency condemned interracial marriage as abnormal. In 1950, Counselor Clark added that 'anything that breaks down the color line leads to marriage.' Five years later, on behalf of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, Joseph Fielding Smith wrote to the First Presidency about African-American members of the LDS church in Utah and referred to the 'danger of intermarriage.'

"In 1953, a First Presidency secretary also informed a white Mormon about the less-obvious extent of Utah's racial segregation: 'The L.D.S. Hospital here in Salt Lake City has a blood bank which does not contain any colored blood.' According to presidency counselor J. Reuben Clark, this policy of segregating African-American blood from the blood donated by so-called 'white people' was intended 'to protect the purity of the blood streams of the people of this Church.'

"During this era of Utah's racial segregation, the First Presidency also repeatedly affirmed that no African-American could stay at the LDS church-owned Hotel Utah (which had maintained this exclusion since its opening in 1911). The LDS president was president of the hotel, and his counselors were its senior vice-presidents. The First Presidency explained this racial exclusion as simply 'the practice of the hotel.'

"Internationally renown singer Marian Anderson endured this racial discrimination in Utah. When she gave her first recital at the University of Utah's Kingsbury Hall, this African-American was denied entry to any of Salt Lake City's hotels and had to stay with one of the concert's promoters. When she returned in March 1948 to participate in a concert at the LDS church's Salt Lake Tabernacle, the First Presidency relented. America's beloved contralto 'was allowed to stay at the Hotel Utah on condition that she use the freight elevator.' This world-famous black woman was not allowed to use the main entrance and lobby.109 Likewise, invited to speak at the University of Utah, Nobel Peace Prize recipient Ralph Bunche was allowed to stay at the LDS church's hotel in 1951 only after this black man agreed to use the freight elevator, 'have his meals in his room and not come to the dining room.'

"Due to their international fame, Anderson and Bunche were exceptions to the Mormon rules of race. As Hotel Utah's senior vice-president, J. Reuben Clark explained: 'Since they are not entitled to the Priesthood, the Church discourages social intercourse with the negro race... ." Therefore, African-Americans were denied equal access to the LDS church's hotel in order "to preserve the purity of the race that is entitled to hold the Priesthood.'

"With such beliefs, the LDS First Presidency did what it could to block national efforts for the civil rights of African-Americans. As previously noted, Counselor McKay in 1949 instructed an Arizona stake president against that state's proposed legislation to 'guarantee rights of Negroes.' Making specific reference to the desegregation controversy in Little Rock, Arkansas, Counselor Clark in 1957 instructed Belle Smith Spafford 'that she should do what she could to keep the National Council [of Women] from going on record in favor of what in the last analysis would be regarded as negro equality.' At that time, Spafford was a vice-president of the National Council of Women.

"As American views began changing toward race relations from the 1940s onward, the Mormons of Utah continued to follow the example of LDS leaders against civil rights for African-Americans. There was widespread use in all-white neighborhoods of Utah's Uniform Real Estate Contract, Form 30, which prohibited the purchaser of real estate and his/her heirs from reselling the property 'to any person not of the Caucasian race.' The Salt Lake City School District prohibited blacks from being teachers and from fulfilling student-teaching requirements of their university training. In addition, 40 percent of Utah's employers refused to hire Negroes. Employers who did hire blacks also discriminated against them in job assignment, promotion, and salary. Blacks were prohibited from eating at the lunch counter of Salt Lake's City-County Building. All of Utah's bowling alleys excluded African-Americans, and LDS hospitals segregated black patients, sometimes requiring them to pay for private rooms. This was also the policy at Utah's Catholic hospitals.

"In these respects, Utah and the Mormons were representative of the rest of America's white society until the 1960s. In 1961, a survey of Salt Lake City by the NAACP showed that 12 percent of cafes, restaurants, and taverns declined to serve blacks, while 80 percent of the city's beauty shops and barber shops refused to do so. Likewise, 72 percent of Salt Lake City's hotels and 49 percent of its motels refused accommodations to African-Americans that year.

"After Counselor Clark's death in 1961, Apostle Ezra Taft Benson became the Mormon hierarchy's strident voice against the national crusade for African-American civil rights. Benson's Negrophobic rhetoric intensified after the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964 drastically changed Utah's patterns of racial discrimination. In 1965 and 1967, he stated in televised meetings on Temple Square in Salt Lake City that 'the so-called civil rights movement as it exists today is a Communist program for revolution in America.' In 1967, Apostle Benson also approved the use of one of his talks as the forward to the overtly racist book 'Black Hammer,' which featured the decapitated (and profusely bleeding) head of an African-American male on its cover. Subtitled White Alternatives, this book warned about the 'well-defined plans for the establishment of a Negro Soviet dictatorship in the South.' In 1968, Apostle Benson also instructed BYU students about 'black Marxists' and 'the Communists and their Black Power fanatics.'

"At this time, LDS president David O. McKay had a Democrat (Hugh B. Brown) as a counselor, who was mystified that McKay allowed Benson to endorse the speeches and activities of nationally known segregationists. This politically liberal counselor was unaware of the LDS church president's private views about 'insolent' African-Americans who wanted equal rights.

"In 1963, Utah ended its restrictions on interracial marriage, and Counselor Brown officially endorsed civil rights for persons of all races that year. However, until that year, every living prophet of the LDS church since Brigham Young either actively opposed the civil rights of African-Americans or passively endorsed the existing civil discriminations against them in Utah.

"In that same year, Apostle Joseph Fielding Smith told Look magazine's editor: '"Darkies" are wonderful people, and they have their place in our Church.' At best, this revealed the racial paternalism that governed LDS headquarters. However, this platitude was also a smoke-screen for the worst of what Utah Mormon leaders had done against African-American rights for the previous 116 years.


"From Anti-Black to Anti-Gay

"Just as President Gordon B. Hinckley has said that same-sex marriage has no legitimate claim as a 'civil right' in Utah or anywhere else, previous First Presidencies also stated that African-Americans had no legitimate right to unrestricted access to marriage, nor to unrestricted blood transfusions, nor to rent a room in the LDS church's hotel, nor to reside in Utah's white neighborhoods, nor to live near the Los Angeles Temple, nor to be in a hospital bed next to a white patient. Just as the First Presidency previously condemned interracial marriages as abnormal, it has recently condemned same-sex marriages as abnormal. The LDS church's opposition to gay rights is consistent with its historical opposition to African-American rights.

"Even when a general authority publicly apologized in September 2000 for 'the actions and statements of individuals who have been insensitive to the pain suffered by the victims of racism,' he claimed that the LDS leadership had an admirable history of race relations. Elder Alexander B. Morrison said: 'How grateful I am that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has from its beginnings stood strongly against racism in any of its malignant manifestations.' This was a by now familiar smoke-screen for the previous behavior of Mormon prophets, seers, and revelators. LDS headquarters has never apologized for the legalization of Negro slavery by Brigham Young in pioneer Utah, nor for the official LDS encouragement to lynch Negro males, nor for the racial segregation policies of the First Presidency until 1963, nor for Ezra Taft Benson's 1967 endorsement of a book which implied that decapitating black males was a 'White Alternative.' . . .

"For persons who believe that these various actions of the LDS First Presidency were God's will for suppressing minorities, I suggest they rethink a passage in The Book of Mormon: 'For none of these iniquities come of the Lord; for he doeth that which is good among the children of men; and he doeth nothing save it be plain unto the children of men; and he inviteth them all to come unto him and partake of his goodness; and he denieth none that come unto him, black and white, bond and free, male and female; and he remembereth the heathen; and all are alike unto God, both Jew and Gentile' (2 Nephi 26:33).

"Counselor Clark told the general conference of April 1940 that the First Presidency 'is not infallible in our judgment, and we err.' I believe this applies to the statements and actions of several 'living prophets' and First Presidencies in restricting the civil rights of African-Americans and other minorities.

"LDS president Gordon B. Hinckley has dismissed Mormonism's earlier race-based policies as 'those little tricks of history' which are irrelevant now. However, his twenty-five years of promoting political campaigns against the possibility of gay rights is one more example of the LDS hierarchy's discrimination against minorities who are not its 'kind of people.'

"Furthermore, Counselor Clark told the general conference of April 1940 that the First Presidency 'is not infallible in our judgment, and we err.] He also instructed LDS educators in 1954 that 'even the President of the Church has not always spoken under the direction of the Holy Ghost.' I believe this applies to the statements and actions of several 'living prophets' and First Presidencies in restricting the civil rights of African-Americans and other minorities. According to LDS doctrine, the statements and actions of the church's president can be wrong, even sinful,145 and historically the LDS First Presidency has often been profoundly wrong with regard to the civil rights of American minorities.

"In fact, when an end came to the various tyrannies of the majority against racial groups in America, LDS policies changed as well. What various 'living prophets' had defined as God's doctrine turned out to be a Mormon social policy which reflected the majority's world view. I submit that the same applies to the LDS church's campaign against any law which benefits or protects gays and lesbians.

"LDS president Gordon B. Hinckley has dismissed Mormonism's earlier race-based policies as 'those little tricks of history' which are irrelevant now. However, his twenty-five years of promoting political campaigns against the possibility of gay rights is one more example of the LDS hierarchy's discrimination against minorities who are not its 'kind of people.'


"The Sincerity of Prejudice and Civil Discrimination

"LDS leaders have repeatedly opposed civil rights for blacks and gays while denying that such action is 'anti-Negro' or 'racist,' 'anti-gay' or 'homophobic.' The previous quotes show that First Presidency counselor J. Reuben Clark, for one, defended wholesale restrictions against the civil rights of African-Americans. Nevertheless, at the same time, he regarded himself as compassionate toward blacks.

"In this paper I have tried to acknowledge the sincere beliefs and fears of those who oppose same-sex marriage. However, an 'Appeal to Sincerity' is legitimate only when attempting to understand the personal motivation for various behaviors. Sincerity cannot logically be invoked to assess the legitimacy or ethical value of those behaviors.

"The past and present are filled with actions which most of us condemn, despite the fact that their perpetrators claimed they acted out of their sincere beliefs in a religion, or race, or social class, or country. If we regard slavery as wrong, the sincerity of slave-owners is irrelevant to the issue, even when the slave-owners were our revered national leaders, George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. If denial of rights and protections for African-Americans was wrong, the sincerity of the oppressors is irrelevant to the issue, even if we otherwise admire the oppressors as religious leaders. Likewise, the sincerity of the heterosexual majority's anxieties and fears is not an ethical justification for denying rights and protections to the homosexual minority. . . .

"In view of the fears, prejudices, and hatreds which existed both then and now, American society's sense of fairness is far greater today than it was fifty years ago. As the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 1996 when Romer v. Evans invalidated the LDS church's behind-the-scenes victory against civil rights for gays and lesbians in Colorado, 'a state cannot so deem a class of persons a stranger to its laws. . . .

"When the Joseph Smith Memorial Building opened in 1993 as added office-space for the LDS bureaucracy at headquarters, this multi-story building had two fine-dining restaurants for the general public. The human resources director instructed the manager of these church-owned restaurants not to hire as waiters any males who 'seem gay.'

"For example, after President Hinckley's statement, Mormon leadership successfully opposed adding sexual orientation to Salt Lake City's anti-discrimination ordinance. This is understandable in light of reports that LDS headquarters actively discriminates against gays and lesbians in employment. With no claim of due process, this discrimination extends to completely secular jobs and requires no proof of 'inappropriate' sexual behavior. For example, when the Joseph Smith Memorial Building opened in 1993 as added office-space for the LDS bureaucracy at headquarters, this multi-story building had two fine-dining restaurants for the general public. The human resources director instructed the manager of these church-owned restaurants not to hire as waiters any males who 'seem gay.' Similar to visual profiling for racial discrimination, LDS headquarters apparently denies employment on the basis of stereotypical views about masculine appearance and homosexual characteristics, or stereotypical views about feminine appearance and lesbian characteristics. As indicated in the above example, this has nothing to do with 'morality' or the actual sexual behavior of persons who are subjected to this discrimination. In fact, completely heterosexual persons may also be misidentified as lesbian or gay on the basis of speech or appearance, and then suffer employment discrimination in Utah, This contributes to the climate of fear, which is why anti-discrimination laws are necessary.

"The climate of homophobic antagonism in Mormon-dominated Utah creates constant anxiety for many gays, lesbians, bisexuals, and transgender persons. It is historically similar to being a Christian in pagan Rome, a Protestant Huguenot in Catholic-dominated France, a Quaker in Puritan Massachusetts, a black in Klan-dominated Mississippi, a Jew in Nazi Germany, a Catholic in Protestant-dominated Belfast, a Muslim in Hindu-dominated Kashmir, or a Hindu in Muslim-dominated Islamabad. Its familiarity makes this pattern even more tragic in cultures which claim divine approval for exerting social oppression against their minorities.

"Just as Catholics, Protestants, and Mormons once claimed righteousness and God's blessing in denying basic rights to African-Americans and Asian-Americans, they are now claiming righteousness and God's blessing for denying basic rights to gays, lesbians, bisexuals, and transgender persons. It takes a peculiar kind of blindness to currently affirm that the majority's historical discrimination against despised racial minorities was ethically and civilly wrong, yet argue that it is now ethically and civilly right to discriminate against the despised minority of homosexuals and transgender persons."

(D. Michael Quinn, "Prelude to the National 'Defense of Marriage' Campaign: Civil Discrimination Against Feared or Despised Minorities," research paper given "Special Award for Outstanding Scholarly Research and Writing," Affirmation Conference, Long Beach, September 2001; originally published in "Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought," 33:3, pp. 1-52; for entire article, see: http://www.affirmation.org/against_marriage_equality/prelude.shtml)

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Posted by: Villager ( )
Date: December 03, 2011 11:25AM

It is one of the better things the church has been involved with.

The last experience I had at a non-IHC hospital in Utah was terrible.

I know the for-profits whine about IHC non-profits status, but my family has received really good care at IHC facilities.

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Posted by: OnceMore ( )
Date: December 03, 2011 12:04PM

Thank you pathdocmd for posting that information.

I was particularly interested in the facts about the manner in which the LDS Church distanced itself from the hospital business, at least on the surface, while simultaneously keeping its hand in.

They did the same thing when they outsourced treating same sex attraction to Evergreen International (see www.evergreeninternational.org).

The Church gets their cover blown, the Church is shown to be unethical in some of their dealings, and the leaders just figure out a way to have a worthy member carry on as before. They don't stop the unethical behavior, they just outsource it.

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Posted by: OnceMore ( )
Date: December 03, 2011 12:28PM

Here's an excerpt from a story that appeared in the Deseret News in September of 1995:

"Citing "numerous serious violations of federal regulations and standards" of testing for HIV and hepatitis B, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has ordered a suspension of LDS Hospital Blood Bank deliveries out of state. The restriction was disclosed Saturday by the Utah Department of Health.

"The blood bank at LDS Hospital, Eighth Avenue and C Street, is the only one to be restricted among the three blood banks operated by Intermountain Health Care. IHC's other outlets are at McKay-Dee Hospital, Ogden, and Utah Valley Regional Medical Center, Provo.An FDA inspection and investigation conducted from July 31 through Sept. 1 found that the blood bank, "in addition to other violations, failed to notify FDA promptly of errors and accidents in the manufacture of blood products; incorrectly interpreted test results for HIV and hepatitis B; released unsuitable units of blood; and accepted blood donations from donors who should have been deferred from donating," according to a statement issued by the agency...."

The Deseret News story goes on to quote hospital officials as saying that only "procedural violations" were involved, and that the blood supply is safe. In other stories appearing around the same time, Deseret News reports characterized the problems with the blood supply as "mix ups."

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Posted by: OnceMore ( )
Date: December 03, 2011 12:37PM

On page 197 of the book "Flesh and blood: organ transplantation and blood transfusion in twentieth..." by Susan E. Lederer, some mormon racism is documented.

Link: http://books.google.com/books?id=JaZn25Uv6XwC&pg=PA197&lpg=PA197&dq=LDS+Hospital+%2B+blood+%2B+negro&source=bl&ots=1HmE4__bjT&sig=VahJtLgMlDR3yN3SI4_fPOyzx7M&hl=en&ei=5lvaTp23BM6rsAKJp-DeDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CDEQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=LDS%20Hospital%20%2B%20blood%20%2B%20negro&f=false

partial quote from above link:

"In 1943, the LDS Hospital opened a blood bank, one of the first in the intermountain West and the second largest in-hospital blood bank...The longstanding Mormon teaching about white racial superiority and concerns that even one drop of "Negro blood" might render a man unacceptable to enter the lay priesthood prompted the hospital's blood bank, like the blood banks in the American south, to maintain separate blood stocks for whites and blacks....
"Although the maintenance of separate blood stocks for whites and blacks had reportedly been abandoned by the 1970s, reporters described how some patients, who expressed concern about receiving blood from black donors, continued to receive the reassurance that this would not happen."

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Posted by: GNPE ( )
Date: December 03, 2011 12:32PM

a few yrs ago, I wrote a ltr to the YBU president asking (him) whether or not YBU was involved with (electro-shock) 'treatment' of gays.

No answer, No response.


yup; "The Truth shall make you free"

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Posted by: OnceMore ( )
Date: December 03, 2011 12:43PM

This quote is from Deconstructor's website:


Mar 3,1953 - First Presidency secretary answers Mormon's inquiry about receiving blood transfusions from African Americans: "The LDS Hospital here in Salt Lake City has a blood bank which does not contain any colored blood." This represents five year effort to keep LDS Hospital's blood bank separate from American Red Cross system in order "to protect the purity of the blood streams of the people of this Church" (Counselor J. Reuben Clark's phrase.)

http://www.i4m.com/think/history/mormon_history.htm

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Posted by: imalive ( )
Date: December 03, 2011 12:47PM

TSCC disgusts me. This is one of the reasons why. >:-(

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Posted by: GNPE ( )
Date: December 03, 2011 12:56PM

Now the official line is: "We were Never Racist"

"A fault once denied is Twice committed" -French proverb



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/03/2011 12:58PM by guynoirprivateeye.

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Posted by: nonner ( )
Date: December 03, 2011 01:56PM

This makes me sick!! I knew IHC was LDS at one point. I have their insurance, select health, and they are still the best around here I gotta say, having had others.

Why would they think people even cared about where the blood came from? In the 1990's if I were dying and needed blood this would never ever occured to me. I would have worried about HIV though, but not this.

But of course I married interacially, and my kids are too.

Stupid church.

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