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Posted by: caffiend ( )
Date: May 12, 2017 10:47AM

In a recent thread,"Did You Ever Drive Drunk?" we learned that SLC TV newswoman Shauna Lake was arrested for DUI. A few remarks speculated about her Mormon status, or lack of.

http://exmormon.org/phorum/read.php?2,1976284

This got me to thinking, does an upbringing in LDS, or other legalistic, alcohol-abstinent religions, increase the possibility that a person may abuse alcohol and/or drugs when he leaves it?

I was brought up in such a faith (Christian Science). I had no experience with alcohol whatsoever until I was in the Marines. I tried it (bourbon and scotch, with Coca Cola chasers), and fell in love with it, or at least the feelings it gave me. I was a very heavy drinker right from the start, and lost my 20s to the stuff.

I was a true innocent to ethanol's effects, and alcohol was presented as an absolute evil, not even as just "something we don't do." I wonder if it might have been different had I been served wine and champagne in moderate amounts during my adolescence by my parents, had some experience, and perhaps observed the problems people experience when they overindulged.

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Posted by: ificouldhietokolob ( )
Date: May 12, 2017 11:17AM

As to the entire population of ex-mormons...got me.

My personal experience was the opposite of yours.
After leaving the "abstinent religion," I tried alcohol...
And never really fell in love with it.
I like a beer now and then, a glass of wine now and then.
But I only got "drunk" once, and hated it. So much that I'd never do it again.
And people who know me now, and know I was a mormon, often speculate that one reason I drink so little is my mormon upbringing.

Based on just you and I, I'd speculate that there might be things other than mormonism's influence involved in our reaction to alcohol...:)

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Posted by: East Coast Exmo ( )
Date: May 12, 2017 12:56PM

My experience is similar to Hie's. I'll drink a glass of wine or beer to be social or to have a small taste of something new, but that's about it. I lack the alcohol enjoyment gene.

The same for opiates. I've been prescribed painkillers after having surgery, but they just make me loopy. I don't see why anyone would take them for fun. I once spoke with a disabled military veteran who had gotten addicted to them, and he told me that taking opiates was a lot like getting drunk. Again, I don't see the appeal.

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Posted by: bender ( )
Date: May 12, 2017 12:29PM

I remember hearing, must be almost twenty years ago now, on the Dr. Drew and Adam Carolla radio show. Dr. Drew had said that mormons that come from the old pioneer stock and are all somewhat related, seem to have a gene, like the Native Americans that makes them more susceptible to alcoholism. He said when mormons leave their faith and start drinking, have a higher likelihood of alcoholism than the rest of the population.

I'm not sure if this is true if if he was just talking out of his ass. In my personal experience, I come from pioneer stock on my dads side, and I can't stand the taste of alcohol. I never got used to it even years later.

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Posted by: primarypianist ( )
Date: May 12, 2017 05:05PM

I can't stand alcohol either. I've had it several times because I enjoyed how it made me feel, at the moment, but the hangovers were usually pretty awful. Luckily I was able to obtain a certain illegal plant, that I enjoy way more, and there's no awful hangover.

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Posted by: cl2 ( )
Date: May 12, 2017 12:36PM

My other 3 siblings went inactive in their teens and were drinking at a young age. They've never really decided they are NOT mormon and have never examined why they left. One of my brothers did tell me that when he finally realized I no longer believe, then he knew he could let go. The other 2, sometimes the mormon in them comes out and they are 63 and 55. They DO NOT live like mormons, don't attend church, but my sister will like things on fb that my daughter posts that blow my mind.

My other 3 siblings drink A LOT. Even they KNOW they drink too much. Only one of them has had DUIs. Those were back in the 1980s. I can't remember how many he has had. The other 2 have not had any DUIs, but they do drink a lot.

Everyone was concerned that if I ever drank, I'd easily be an alcoholic. Maybe if I had started drinking when my ex left me, MAYBE. I also don't get much from alcohol. Never been drunk. I have a drink now and then. My nonmo boyfriend started me out with brandy. All I could think is "I've been drinking NyQuil half my life." I hated brandy. I hate the harder drinks. It seems I also have a very high tolerance because I have TRIED to get a buzz. I've had maybe 2.

Oh, my siblings who drink too much don't eat like I do either. My addiction is food. It is how I deal with stress.

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Posted by: Amyjo ( )
Date: May 12, 2017 12:44PM

On my dad's side is the Mormon side of my family. And there is a definite propensity to alcoholism in his immediate family. My dad and each of his brothers were alcoholics. His mother was a BIC TBM who drank wine medicinally for her heart, two glasses a day, as prescribed by her doctor. Or so the family story goes. It was her rationale for drinking. My dad nor his brothers had any such rationale for theirs.

I was told my BIC TBM grandpa also could drink like a sailor during his early years. I didn't know him then. When I knew him he was sober. The early days of the church drinking wasn't forbidden. The Word of Wisdom was a guideline only, according to my dad, until around the 1940's when it became law to getting temple recommends and such. Up to then Mormons could drink liquor and coffee openly and still be TR holders.

My father's sisters were all teetolars. Of each of them nada one touched the stuff. Why them and not their brothers? They were raised with different standards. Their mom, my grandmother, doted on her boys. They were all mama's boys and could do no wrong. As s result they went through life doing their own thing. While the daughters towed the mark in their home life and at church.

My grandparents were devout LDS, don't get me wrong. They served a couples mission toward the end of their lives in Blackfoot, Idaho among Native American Indians. They loved what they did, and the gospel according to Joey. They were sincere, salt of the earth believers.

The alcohol gene is/was present however I'm convinced, and is hereditary.

My ggggrandmother whose husband was a bodyguard of Joseph had 12 children. She smoked a pipe throughout her life before and after joining the Mormon church. I can only imagine the whiskey that accompanied that pipe habit of hers. How else did she manage to keep her sanity with that many children, and the constant persecution she endured along with her family as an early LDS? It was some bitter persecution they lived through.

Breweries were common throughout early Utah's history, as were pubs.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/12/2017 01:19PM by Amyjo.

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Posted by: relievedtolearn ( )
Date: May 12, 2017 04:42PM

my experience from al-anon: apparently there is a genetic component to people who become alcoholic and those who can drink in moderation. I have heard people who became alcoholic say it only took one drink. For them, total abstinence always would be the only way to guarantee non-alcoholism. I heard a story once in an al-anon meeting where a person who had been abstinent for decades took some cough medicine and was immediately hooked again.

I also am close to a couple of people whose parents were alcoholic; the person chose to drink "in moderation"---but moderation gradually turned into too much, all the time drinking.

My guess is that the genetic component has more to do with it than whether or not you had mild-to-moderate exposure in the family.

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Posted by: Paintingnotloggedin ( )
Date: May 12, 2017 07:29PM

Agreed although it's complicated. Some pioneer tribes have generations of alcoholics flip flopping through them guess some do not. My 1912 dob grandma had active parents who died and was raised by an alcoholic uncle... her 2nd husband after her secret divorce from a polygamist

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Posted by: jacob ( )
Date: May 12, 2017 05:27PM

Hard core abstinance does tend to feed the beast once you let the beast out of the cage. But I think you'll find that many of us on RFM are less apt to let the beast out of the cage because it wasn't why we left to begin with.

Most of us left because Mormonism is immoral, fraudulent, illogical, and so forth. Not because we were stifled by the strict rules. At least to me the strict rules were awful because I hate being treated like a child not because I wanted to break them.

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Posted by: shapeshifter ( )
Date: May 12, 2017 05:31PM

I agree that there is probably a genetic component. When I left I quickly began drinking more than I could handle. But took me years to realize I wasn't in control of my drinking. I was fortunately able to give it up easily when it was adversely affecting my health. And when I finally got into Al Anon because of my relationships with alcoholics. I could see that I had likely been one as well and that if I were to go back to alcohol I would not be in control of it. And the disease would progress.

I had two ex-Mo alcoholic uncles, both now dead from how much it destroyed their health, that and in one case drug addiction. They did end up in recovery eventually but too late to save their bodies.

I also had some issues with overdoing it with drugs. Now I am ironically back to a clean Mormon like no drugs or alcohol existence (never could handle cigarette smoke due to allergies). But now it's for other reasons and my own choice for my health so it's different.

Out of my ex-mo friends/acquaintances some of them couldn't handle alcohol and drugs while others could. So while it feels like it may be related to being ex-mo probably there are other factors.

However the need to escape and lose oneself in something (esp. after being so used to doing so with the religion) I think many of us do try to substitute the religion with some other compulsion. I also had issues with sex addiction for a time. And now I have to watch that I don't overwork. Or overdo anything. Sometimes it's movies and sometimes it's books. Sometimes sugar.. internet searches.. there area lot of options for distraction. Doing the recovery work is difficult. Learning how to live more presently and facing hard emotions and not needing so much excess in order to numb oneself.

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Posted by: relievedtolearn ( )
Date: May 12, 2017 05:37PM

I appreciate this post. over-anything recovery work is difficult, live more presently, facing hard emotions is hard. Yep.

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Posted by: BYU Boner ( )
Date: May 12, 2017 06:16PM

I want to give my friend Caffiend a big hug, shout out, and high five! Thanks, Bro, for sharing a difficult part of your life.

As you know, I wasn't raised LDS. Alcohol (for good and for bad) has always been present as n my life. My very first remembrances of it were trying a sip of my Dad's beer when I was about 6 or 7, and then later a taste of his bourbon and water. I didn't like the taste of either.

My parents did not make alcohol a forbidden fruit. Unfortunately, as you know, my Mom's alcoholism had a devastating effect on my life--first as a co-alcoholic, and later as an Adult Child of an Alcoholic. Her alcoholism did not have a happy ending, and I've witnessed her going through the DTs and substance abuse treatments.

When I was 18, my parents bought a magnum of champagne for me, my girlfriend, and another couple to celebrate my BD. We polished it off. Their philosophy was--alcohol is a part of the culture, kids will drink, and we'd rather you had a drink at home, under guidance, as an adult.

As a Mormon, I eschewed alcohol for several decades. Eventually, I'd have a glass of wine or a beer to be social with friends or my nevermo family.

I'm of the opinion that anything can be an excess in life that causes great harm to the person and the person's family. The litmus test for me is if a behavior, idea, or substance is more important than a person or family, then that behavior, idea, or substance is abusive. For example, we read time and time again on this board about children being abused, shunned, or greatly hurt because of their parents' Mormon beliefs. That is religious abuse, IMO, and the parents are addicted--addicted to a religion.

Some people like the taste of alcohol, for many it's an acquired taste, but the relaxing effects are pleasant (initially). It is a social lubricant. It's also celebratory--last night me and a couple of buddies had wings and beer over a great conversations.

My casual beer drinking does not affect my life or my family's lives. If I'm dealing with a very difficult situation, I don't even have a casual beer. It's when a behavior, idea, or substance is used to alter reality that the potential for abuse is present. People with any sort of substance, behavior, or idea abuse problem self-medicate to alter reality. Altered reality leads to abuse.

My own opinion is that drinking should be considered a normal part of adult culture and that parents should take preventative action and discuss alcohol with their children. Alcohol beverages should not be offered to kids until they're of the legal drinking age, but a taste here or there is not going to create an instant alcoholic. Very best wishes! The Boner.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/12/2017 06:21PM by BYU Boner.

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Posted by: shapeshifter ( )
Date: May 12, 2017 06:43PM

I agree that there is probably a genetic component. When I left I quickly began drinking more than I could handle. But took me years to realize I wasn't in control of my drinking. I was fortunately able to give it up easily when it was adversely affecting my health. And when I finally got into Al Anon because of my relationships with alcoholics. I could see that I had likely been one as well and that if I were to go back to alcohol I would not be in control of it. And the disease would progress.

I had two ex-Mo alcoholic uncles, both now dead from how much it destroyed their health, that and in one case drug addiction. They did end up in recovery eventually but too late to save their bodies.

I also had some issues with overdoing it with drugs. Now I am ironically back to a clean Mormon like no drugs or alcohol existence (never could handle cigarette smoke due to allergies). But now it's for other reasons and my own choice for my health so it's different.

Out of my ex-mo friends/acquaintances some of them couldn't handle alcohol and drugs while others could. So while it feels like it may be related to being ex-mo probably there are other factors.

However the need to escape and lose oneself in something (esp. after being so used to doing so with the religion) I think many of us do try to substitute the religion with some other compulsion. I also had issues with sex addiction for a time. And now I have to watch that I don't overwork. Or overdo anything. Sometimes it's movies and sometimes it's books. Sometimes sugar.. internet searches.. there area lot of options for distraction. Doing the recovery work is difficult. Learning how to live more presently and facing hard emotions and not needing so much excess in order to numb oneself.

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Posted by: BYU Boner ( )
Date: May 12, 2017 06:47PM

Here's to you and recovery! Thanks for your powerful observations.

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Posted by: summer ( )
Date: May 12, 2017 07:53PM

I also believe that alcoholism has a genetic component.

There is something to be said for having a child observe the adults in his or her life drinking in a responsible manner. By the time I hit my mid-teens my family allowed me to have a glass of wine with dinner or the occasional glass of beer.
(I was only allowed to drink at home or while closely supervised.) Thus I learned what was reasonable and responsible. I also learned about different wines. My family sometimes hosted wine tasting parties with family friends where I learned what I liked and what I did not like. I learned descriptive words such as fruity, grassy, or gravelly. As a teen, I quite confidently ordered wine with my dinner while visiting Paris.

(Being a nevermo is fun, eh?)

As a college student, like most college students, I sometimes overindulged. But we walked everywhere in groups and were never in any real danger. I always say that overindulging is self-instructive. Have enough hangovers, and you eventually get to a point where you don't want to go there again if you can help it.

Interestingly, my friends readily recognized that one of our group had developed a significant problem. She was drinking heavily and having blackouts (periods of time for which she had no recall.) She had diabetes, so that was a significant factor. Her family realized that she had a serious issue and had her transfer to a school closer to home where she could get more support. IMO young people who indulge tend to know when one of their own is in trouble.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/12/2017 07:55PM by summer.

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Posted by: adoylelb ( )
Date: May 12, 2017 08:17PM

I'm another one who believes that alcoholism might have a genetic component. I think it's possible that those who are direct descendants of Mormon pioneers might have that genetic tendency since it's one reason the cult eventually banned alcohol. Another thing is that in Mormonism, there's also the possibility that those who leave go overboard with the things they weren't allowed to partake in.

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Posted by: catnip ( )
Date: May 19, 2017 03:08AM

addiction in general.

I don't remember whether it was Deconstructor or SL Cabbie who got me started reading Patrick Carnes. Carnes' specialty, as I recall, is sexual addiction, but he wrote what I think is one of the best definitions of "addiction" I've ever read.

He defined it as any kind of behavior which, when it spirals out of control, can cause harm. There are lots of behaviors that can be indulged in from time to time, without a problem. It's when you over-indulge that there can be a problem.

I come from a long line of alcoholics, so I was very cautious when I took my first drink. I was a pretty quick learner. The first time I got seriously drunk, I got the Hangover from Hell. So my body apparently has built-in resistance to that. I can and do occasionally indulge in a single Margarita with dinner, and have never had the urge to keep drinking.

There was a time - when I was also dealing with a rocky marriage to an abuser, post-partum depression, and a job I hated, when I went through a period of over-spending. I eventually drove myself into bankruptcy, and had to re-learn my spending habits the hard way, but I no longer feel the compulsion to spend. Whenever I can transfer some money from checking to savings, it's a good feeling. Success, but not compulsion.

I am also a sugar junkie, but because my DH is diabetic, I don't keep sugary stuff around the house. Better for both of us.

I'm also a borderline book junkie, but because I'm getting old and can't always remember how my favorite books turned out, I can read them again and again and still enjoy them, so there may be an upside to getting old!!

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Posted by: midwestanon ( )
Date: May 12, 2017 10:47PM

My experiences in the Utah rehab culture have led me to believe that Mormon backgrounds Factor heavily in people's journey into addiction, whether that is from a genetic component or from people trying to rebel against Mormonism, with the perception that drinking or using drugs is something you should do because it is what you are told exactly not to do.

I can't tell you how many Mormons I met in treatment who are addicts in large part due to a dysfunctional Mormon upbringing. No one in their immediate family was an addict, but they became one because they had so much pressure from their family to succeed or do this or that. Pretty standard addict background stuff, just with a Mormon component, which adds an extra dose of guilt and fire and brimstone type of "you're going to hell for doing this" type of thing.

As I have stated on this forum many times, I feel like my upbringing was absolutely key in developing my addiction. I don't think I would have thought of drugs and alcohol as such a rebellious thing to do if I weren't taught that it was so evil. I don't think Mormons, or lots of people for that matter, understand that there isn't anything inherently evil about drugs or alcohol. It's one of the few things from AA I truly believe, that they teach that it's not as no alcohol forces itself down your mouth or needles full of heroin or pipes full of crack force their way into your veins or into your lungs. They're just things. Belittling them gives them a life of their own, almost an identity and consciousness.

I heard that message about so many things, not just drugs and alcohol. I think when people hear that they get these strange ideas about the world, and assume that they're all these inherent evils and go around describing things as intrinsically good or evil. It's one of the things I can't stand about Mormonism and most religions. Sorry if this is difficult to understand.

I guess a better way to put it is the way Mormonism teaches things like murder is wrong and stealing is wrong- and most importantly not being a Mormon is wrong, and so and so is wrong and there are no exceptions, etc.

Well, yeah, obviously and that's an important thing to teach people, but if you don't expand on that and questions aren't asked about why those things are evil and what makes them evil and why people do them anyway and people don't question these things then it's just another form of brainwashing.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 05/13/2017 01:12PM by midwestanon.

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Posted by: bobofitz ( )
Date: May 14, 2017 12:38PM

Although I realize personal anecdotes are not valid proofs of anything, my particular choice to try, and eventually habitually use, tobacco, alcohol, and illegal drugs was strongly a reaction to the pressure I felt to conform to Church rules. Although I had intellectually rebelled far sooner, that wasn't enough. I felt my statement was much more visible thru acting out bad behaviors. I of course realize now as an older, wiser man the foolishness of my decisions, but at the time this " image" of rebelliousness was important to me.

In my opinion, the linking of poor health habits to some supernatural influence defined as "Evil" is counter productive to efforts to properly educate people as to the dangers of these poor health habits. I know was in my case.

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Posted by: LeftTheMorg ( )
Date: May 14, 2017 01:21PM

I have to agree with those who said they believe a tendency to get hooked on drugs or alcohol likely has a genetic component.

I was raised LDS and after leaving the church I tried alcohol but have never really gotten a "taste" for it. I can enjoy some good wine now and then, but don't enjoy any other form of alcohol. I think it just must be something in whatever it is I'm made up of, genetics or something.

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Posted by: Trails end ( )
Date: May 14, 2017 02:05PM

One of my pet theories with no support except anecdotes and experience..is that people with screws loose or tendencies toward magic beliefs were first attracted to moism...abuse of all types seems connected with addiction...some studies lately seeming to draw a connection genetically to abuse and addiction....be it food sex booze even dare i say shopping or dope...the vehicle doesnt matter...the pathology seems the same...much of my theory stems from my own buggy ride through nutsville and trying to make sense of madness...hoarding and food storeage even would indicate deep seated fear and insecurity...so much for faith in the big guy having your back...now Stan...that guy seems to have some chutzpah...scares even the most resolute mormons into a drooling tearful fit of testiphony bearing and hoarding more toilet paper and pinto beans

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Posted by: Itzpapalotl ( )
Date: May 14, 2017 02:36PM

Yes, it does. The all or nothing approach can affect newly minted exmos when they dive headfirst into the world of hedonism. I experienced this firsthand with exmos fresh out of the cult and we partied way too hard at times. Those with a high need for stimulation and/or sensation (like me) are affected in a different way when it comes to psychotropics and other activities that produce dopamine, then highs and lows can be more intense than average. Luckily, I got out of the life and found that school is just as satisfyingly stimulating.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/14/2017 02:39PM by Itzpapalotl.

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Posted by: Free Man ( )
Date: May 15, 2017 01:15AM

After I quit church, thought I'd try booze and realized it was disgusting. I am not much of a herd animal so threw it away and haven't bothered since. Amazing how people need to conform to some nasty habit just because society says so.

And not being a herd animal is a big part of why I left the church.

I went to a party with some coworkers once and they were trying to convert me to drinking and gave me the creeps. But I finally took a swig of beer to shut them up, and you should have seen the joy on their faces. Reminded me of my mission after getting a new convert.

Just tonight my son-in-law was trying to get me to drink with him. Guess he wants me to join the booze gang for some kind of bonding.

I will say that reality sucks more for some people, and any escape is nice, but booze often seems to make things worse in the long run. But humans, like other animals, don't seem to think very far ahead.

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Posted by: Lot's Wife ( )
Date: May 19, 2017 05:07AM

A tentative hypothesis. . .

The literature on addiction indicates that most addicts have both a genetic predisposition and a history of childhood trauma or neglect. I don't know if there is a genetic mutation that renders Mormons more than typically susceptible to drug addition--and for that matter to risky behavior. But as I wrote in the thread on borderline personality disorder and Mormonism, I think Mormon child-rearing culture is damaging. That alone could produce an above-average rate of addiction.

I therefore think that there is a cluster of problems, from personality disorders to addictions and excessive risk taking, that should be considered jointly. It would take some serious research to figure out if Mormons are abnormally subject to these problems and if the causes lie in childhood, but I have a hunch that that might be the case. There is certainly anecdotal evidence to support that theory.

Mormons would of course interpret unusual prevalence of such problems as indicative of what happens when one turns away from the gospel. Nor would they want to know if something in LDS culture is harming their children. But surely the bizarre and painful elements of Mormonism must leave their mark.

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Posted by: commongentile ( )
Date: May 19, 2017 06:05AM

I'll add my opinion here, which is in line with some of the posts in this thread.

I don't think that becoming an alcoholic has any direct connection with leaving a religion that forbids alcohol use. I think alcoholism primarily has to do with heredity/genetics and metabolism. Observation of the devastating effects of alcoholism in my own family reinforces this for me. Alcoholism has been fairly prevalent in my family.

One example: As Caffiend indicated in his opening post, the Christian Science Church teaches against alcohol use. My step-mother was a Christian Scientist. Her first husband, the father of my step-sister, was an alcoholic and his drinking eventually led to my step-mother divorcing him. His daughter, my step-sister, was raised in Christian Science, but when she went to college she tried drinking through the influence of her boyfriend. It wasn't long before she became a hopeless alcoholic, and it ruined her life. Some of her children are now alcoholics. Similar things have happened in other branches of my family. I think my step-sister abused alcohol primarily because such abuse "ran in her family."

I think it is good when people develop reasons for what they do that go beyond merely blindly following the dictates of a church or other organization. Some of the threads in this forum give me impression that the only reason that some here didn't drink is because the "one true Church" forbid them to do so.

Wanted to add something as well about caffeine. I'm old enough to remember a time when devout Mormon missionaries would abstain from any beverage containing caffeine, not just coffee and tea. In fact, they would teach investigators that the problem with coffee and tea is the caffeine. Now the Church has indicated that caffeine isn't a problem, and I've seen missionaries these days freely drinking caffeinated soft drinks (probably not very healthy), and telling investigators who have coffee in the morning that they must give it up. I've even known of some who have given up coffee and just switched to a can of a caffeinated soft drink in the morning!

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Posted by: Amyjo ( )
Date: May 20, 2017 04:33AM

Interesting note about a paradigm shift in thinking towards caffeine you make.

Phosphoric acid, aspartame in diet, or large quantity of sugar in non-diet sodas are far worse for health than tea or coffee.

At a minimum teas and coffee provide certain health benefits not found in sodas.

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Posted by: ren ( )
Date: May 20, 2017 12:12AM

One time at BYU-I I drank a bottle and a half of wine in one sitting (note: I'm a 120 pound female). My roommate helped me to my room, I passed out on the bed, and threw up the next morning. Its been two years and I still can't taste or smell wine without feeling nauseous.

All the rules just made me want to rebel, which I did through occasional binge drinking. I don't drink often (mostly because I'm 20 and still living with TBM parents until I transfer from community college to a four year college), but when I do it's usually in excess. I'm working on toning it down, though.

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Posted by: Amyjo ( )
Date: May 20, 2017 04:39AM

I hope you get help for what gives cause to your binge drinking. It's good you understand in part the motivation behind it.

You may be an alcoholic and not know it. Have you checked out an Al-Anon program where you live? They're free to attend, and like the name says anonymous. And international.

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Posted by: ren ( )
Date: May 20, 2017 12:08PM

Thank you! I don't think I'm an alcoholic (college culture involves a lot of drinking, so I'm not that different from other people), and I'm usually not doing anything unsafe (I always have a designated driver), but I'll definitely look into meetings if my drinking gets any worse. I like to think I've improved since I was at BYU-I. I blacked out this weekend, but it was the first time that happened in a while.

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Posted by: Amyjo ( )
Date: May 20, 2017 03:59PM

If you don't drink often now, and still experiencing blackout spells, it may be your body is too petite to handle any amount of booze you give it.

The smaller the body mass, the less alcohol one can drink "safely." One drink may be too many for your frame, in other words.

Also, it's never advisable to drink on an empty stomach, or mixing drinks. You probably already know all this, but just mentioning it in case you hadn't.

I drank as a young adult, too much. Beer I could handle alright enough and seemed to have a lead stomach for it. Stronger drinks proved too much, and even one drink of liquor I found myself suffering a hangover from. It made me feel so nauseous from drinking at all, it was not hard for me to give it up when I did.

Now I can't stand the taste of beer and haven't touched it since I was your age. Rarely I may have a sip of wine, or stronger drink. Less than 2-3 times a year on average, if that. Never to get drunk. I don't like the feeling of losing control.

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Posted by: ren ( )
Date: May 20, 2017 04:25PM

Thanks for the advice! I do already know those guidelines, but I've mostly learned from trial/error, friends, and Google, since no one else in my family drinks. From my experience my tolerance is pretty average, I think. Last weekend I just made the mistake of starting to take shots after I had already had three bottles of hard cider, and on Sunday I woke up with a terrible hangover.

I'm a very happy drunk, and it makes my anxiety go away, so I like the experience. If I exercise moderation that's fine, but I'm an impulsive person, and after I start drinking I have a hard time stopping (usually I drink as much as I can without throwing up, which obviously isn't good).

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Posted by: SusieQ#1 ( )
Date: May 20, 2017 05:24PM

Scientists have discovered the gene that is statistically linked to alcoholism.

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Posted by: caffiend ( )
Date: May 20, 2017 06:46PM

Fascinating, and I'd appreciate your sourcing that, if you can. I noticed through this thread several people said, "I believe genetics..." "I understand there may be a genetic propensity..." etc. I've heard such statements a lot over the decades, and have always wondered where the science ended and conjeture began.

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Posted by: SusieQ#1 ( )
Date: May 20, 2017 06:51PM

caffiend Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Fascinating, and I'd appreciate your sourcing
> that, if you can. I noticed through this thread
> several people said, "I believe genetics..." "I
> understand there may be a genetic propensity..."
> etc. I've heard such statements a lot over the
> decades, and have always wondered where the
> science ended and conjeture began.


I googled it... plus it has been brought up many times in the past. I'll see if I can find a study.
Genetics is not the only influence, of course, only about half.

This is one report: https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/overview-alcohol-consumption/alcohol-use-disorders/genetics-alcohol-use-disorders

It appears to have a strong gene component in my family. I would not even consider drinking, plus it upsets my sensitive stomach! :-)

Addendum: I have been told that in our case, it is likely the English, Irish Scottish heritage that is at the root. Sounds plausible, but who knows! I do know there are three generations of at least one alcoholic in my direct line on one side alone.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 05/20/2017 07:03PM by SusieQ#1.

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Posted by: holydiver ( )
Date: May 20, 2017 10:14PM

I LOVE alcahol, when I was a bachelor I always had a 30pack of keystone in the fridge, I had to stop, considering I'm living with my tbm parents while I work (I travel a lot for my job and living with the 'rents stops me paying 600 a mo when I'm only home a week and a half a month) even after drinking like a fish for a year, I didn't have a problem stopping... I miss it though

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