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Posted by: Anon67 ( )
Date: February 02, 2011 07:22PM

Hey, I've been reading a bit into Mormonism as some of you had suggested. I was wondering what is the difference from a temple wedding than a regular wedding, besides the eternal seal and not allowing non-Mormons. Is it different vows or is the ceremony all together different? I don't get how they could be extremly different, I mean to me a wedding is basically two people who are in love joining together and becoming bound under the law.

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Posted by: Serena ( )
Date: February 02, 2011 07:30PM

No flowers, no music, no processing, no bridesmaids, or groomsmen, which is just for pictures, but especially no making vows and promises to each other, but to the church. Unless the officiating bishop chooses to add it, there is no mention of love in the official ceremony.

You can find a transcript online, or SusieQ#1 has it.

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Posted by: SusieQ#1 ( )
Date: February 02, 2011 11:03PM

This is a review of the temple sealing including some background and scriptural references on where the basis for it comes from. There are web sites with more information.

After passing two interviews to get the temple recommend--
(see Temple Recommend Questions here: http://www.lds-mormon.com/veilworker/recommend.shtml,)

then going through the Endowment Ceremony either on the day of the marriage, or earlier,

Washing and Anointing ceremony (only done once for yourself) where the Holy Garment of the Priesthood (notice ladies, you wear the same garment of the Holy Priesthood!), is placed on you and covenanting to obey:

The Law of Obedience
The Law of Sacrifice
The Law of the Gospel
The Law of Chastity
The Law of Consecration --which is:(I am only including this particular one on this post as it has it directly applies to the marriage covenant.)
Info on: Garments, each covenant here: http://www.lds4u.com/lesson5/templecovenants.htm

then, and only then may you be married/sealed in the temple.


This is the Law of Consecration that proceeds the Marriage/wedding/sealing.


Officiator:
A couple will now come to the altar. We are instructed to give unto you the Law of Consecration as contained in the book of Doctrine and Covenants, in connection with the Law of the Gospel and the Law of Sacrifice which you have already received.

It is that you do consecrate yourselves, your time, talents, and everything with which the Lord has blessed you, or with which he may bless you, to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, for the building up of the Kingdom of God on the earth and for the establishment of Zion.

All arise. Each of you bring your right arm to the square.
You and each of you covenant and promise before God, angels, and these witnesses at this altar, that you do accept the Law of Consecration as contained in the Doctrine and Covenants, in that you do consecrate yourselves, your time, talents, and everything with which the Lord has blessed you, or with which he may bless you, to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, for the building up of the Kingdom of God on the earth and for the establishment of Zion.

Each of you bow your head and say "yes."


Then and only then, after completing the entire Endowment Ceremony, making all of the Covenants, you may be sealed in the marriage ceremony.

Here is the ceremony.

Sometimes, the officiator will allow an exchange of rings at the end of the ceremony, and a kiss.
(I don't know the current policy on this practice. Maybe someone else does.)

Officiator: Brother ______, [naming groom] and Sister ______, [naming bride] please join hands in the Patriarchal Grip or Sure Sign of the Nail.

Marriage Couple:
Joins hands in the "Patriarchal Grip, or Sure Sign of the Nail."This token is given by clasping the right hands, interlocking the little fingers and placing the tip of the forefinger upon the center of the wrist. No clothing should interfere with the contact of the forefinger upon the wrist.

Officiator: Brother ______, do you take Sister ______ by the right hand and receive her unto yourself to be your lawful and wedded wife for time and all eternity, with a covenant and promise that you will observe and keep all the laws, rites, and ordinances pertaining to this Holy Order of Matrimony in the New and Everlasting Covenant, and this you do in the presence of God, angels, and these witnesses of your own free will and choice?

Groom: Yes.

Officiator: Sister ______ do you take brother ______ by the right hand and give yourself to him to be his lawful and wedded wife, and for him to be your lawful and wedded husband, for time and all eternity, with a covenant and promise that you will observe and keep all the laws, rites and ordinances pertaining to this Holy Order of Matrimony in the New and Everlasting Covenant, and this you do in the presence of God, angels, and these witnesses of your own free will and choice?

Bride: Yes.

Officiator:
By virtue of the Holy Priesthood and the authority vested in me, I pronounce you ______, and ______, legally and lawfully husband and wife for time and all eternity, and I seal upon you the blessings of the holy resurrection with power to come forth in the morning of the first resurrection clothed in glory, immortality and eternal lives, and I seal upon you the blessings of kingdoms, thrones, principalities, powers, dominions and exaltations, with all the blessings of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and say unto you: be fruitful and multiply and replenish the earth that you may have joy and rejoicing in the day of our Lord Jesus Christ.

All these blessings, together with all the blessings appertaining unto the New and Everlasting Covenant, I seal upon you by virtue of the Holy Priesthood, through your faithfulness, in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, Amen.

To make sure one understands exactly what the "New and Everlasting Covenant" is, see: D&C 132. In the temple it is just called the New and Everlasting Covenant, the words: Plurality of Wives is omitted.

To understand the background for the temple marriage/sealing ceremony:

REFERENCE for easy reading: http://scriptures.lds.org/dc/132

Revelation given through Joseph Smith the Prophet, at Nauvoo, Illinois, recorded July 12, 1843, relating to the new and everlasting covenant, including the eternity of the marriage covenant, as also plurality of wives. HC 5: 501—507.
Although the revelation was recorded in 1843, it is evident from the historical records that the doctrines and principles involved in this revelation had been known by the Prophet since 1831.

[INSERT: compare introduction to the 1969 edition of the Book of Mormon.

Here's the 1969 version:

Revelation given through Joseph Smith the Prophet, at Nauvoo, Illinois, recorded July 12, 1843, relating to the new and everlasting covenant, including the eternity of the marriage covenant, as also plurality of wives.

-------The Prophet’s inquiry of the Lord--He is told to prepare himself to receive the new and everlasting covenant--Conditions of this law--The power of the Holy Priesthood instituted by the Lord must be operative in ordinances to be in effect beyond the grave--
Marriage by secular authority is of effect during mortality only--Though the form of marriage should make it appear to be for time and eternity, the ordinance is not valid beyond the grave unless solemnized by the authority of the Holy Priesthood as the Lord directs--
Marriage duly authorized for time and eternity to be attended by surpassing blessings--E
ssentials for the attainment of the status of godhood -- The meaning of eternal lives--Plurality of wives acceptable only when commanded by the Lord--The sin of adultery--Commandment to Emma Smith, wife of the prophet.http://scriptures.lds.org/dc/132
1981 edition:
1—6, Exaltation is gained through the new and everlasting covenant;
7—14, The terms and conditions of that covenant are set forth;
15—20, Celestial marriage and a continuation of the family unit enable men to become gods;
21—25, The strait and narrow way that leads to eternal lives;
26—27, Law given relative to blasphemy against the Holy Ghost;
28—39, Promises of eternal increase and exaltation made to prophets and saints in all ages;
40—47, Joseph Smith is given the power to bind and seal on earth and in heaven;
48—50, The Lord seals upon him his exaltation;
51—57, Emma Smith is counseled to be faithful and true;
58—66, Laws governing the plurality of wives are set forth.

Did you catch it? Celestial Marriage is Plurality of Wives! The Mormon Church has never, ever stopped practicing their law that applies to polygamy or plurality of wives as that is what Celestial Marriage (The New and Everlasting Covenant) is!

Did you notice that the marriage sealing ceremony not only continues the practice of polygamy, and, because of the covenant of the Law of Consecration, married you to the church and it's commandments by covenant, not each other?

Investigators BEWARE:
Demand full disclosure for informed consent. You won't get it from the Mormon Church, so do your own research.

Know what you are doing, and what it really means!

I doubt most LDS couples recognize and understand that they married in to plurality of wives when they were sealed in the temple.


The actual sealing ceremony takes place in a sealing room off of the Celestial Room in the temple. Attendees must have a valid temple recommend and be invited. They may dress in white or in Sunday Best.

This is how it is done in the US. In England, for instance, the marriage part is performed in a chapel (or elsewhere) by a presiding authority (usually a bishop) with an official government recorder of some sort in attendance. Attendees are invited, no temple recommend required.

The sealing ceremony is performed in the temple at a later time either that day or another day.

My personal opinion is that I would like to see it done that way in the US so

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Posted by: anon123 ( )
Date: February 03, 2011 01:28AM

SusieQ#1 wrote:
-----------------------------------
> Officiator: Brother ______, do you take Sister
> ______ by the right hand and receive her unto
> yourself to be your lawful and wedded wife for
> time and all eternity, with a covenant and promise
> that you will observe and keep all the laws,
> rites, and ordinances pertaining to this Holy
> Order of Matrimony in the New and Everlasting
> Covenant, and this you do in the presence of God,
> angels, and these witnesses of your own free will
> and choice?
>
> Groom: Yes.
>
> Officiator: Sister ______ do you take brother
> ______ by the right hand and give yourself to him
> to be his lawful and wedded wife, and for him to
> be your lawful and wedded husband, for time and
> all eternity, with a covenant and promise that you
> will observe and keep all the laws, rites and
> ordinances pertaining to this Holy Order of
> Matrimony in the New and Everlasting Covenant, and
> this you do in the presence of God, angels, and
> these witnesses of your own free will and choice?
>
> Bride: Yes.
>

I may be reading into this to much, but it just sounds like the wife gives herself away. "give yourself to him". And all she promises is for him to be her lawfully wedded husband, but when the groom is asked, there is no mention of husband. Just receiving the wife. Anybody else notice this?

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Posted by: SusieQ#1 ( )
Date: February 03, 2011 12:55PM

anon123 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> SusieQ#1 wrote:
> -----------------------------------
> > Officiator: Brother ______, do you take Sister
> > ______ by the right hand and receive her unto
> > yourself to be your lawful and wedded wife for
> > time and all eternity, with a covenant and
> promise
> > that you will observe and keep all the laws,
> > rites, and ordinances pertaining to this Holy
> > Order of Matrimony in the New and Everlasting
> > Covenant, and this you do in the presence of
> God,
> > angels, and these witnesses of your own free
> will
> > and choice?
> >
> > Groom: Yes.
> >
> > Officiator: Sister ______ do you take brother
> > ______ by the right hand and give yourself to
> him
> > to be his lawful and wedded wife, and for him
> to
> > be your lawful and wedded husband, for time and
> > all eternity, with a covenant and promise that
> you
> > will observe and keep all the laws, rites and
> > ordinances pertaining to this Holy Order of
> > Matrimony in the New and Everlasting Covenant,
> and
> > this you do in the presence of God, angels, and
> > these witnesses of your own free will and
> choice?
> >
> > Bride: Yes.
> >
>
> I may be reading into this to much, but it just
> sounds like the wife gives herself away. "give
> yourself to him". And all she promises is for him
> to be her lawfully wedded husband, but when the
> groom is asked, there is no mention of husband.
> Just receiving the wife. Anybody else notice this?


BINGO. It's more about covenanting to keep the Law of Consecration than anything else. There is no mention of the word love anywhere in any of the temple dialog either.

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Posted by: topojoejoe ( )
Date: February 04, 2011 02:57PM

Yes, because if you are a woman you will not be his 'only wife' so he takes you, and you give yourself to him. But he does NOT give himself to you, as that would imply, only you. He will take you, and he will take the others that will follow in this life or the next.

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Posted by: astonished ( )
Date: May 24, 2011 10:00PM

can u guys be any more petty, seriously!

perhaps if u had a bit more of an eternal perspective u might understand a bit better.u know that all the wedding hype these days are just money making schemes, however beautiful it all is. people go into huge debt for 1 day that lasts a micro second in your lifetime. and even if u do have a temple marriage u can still spend all that money if u want but being married should never be about the money u spend on your wedding day or how visually appealing it is for everyone.

i was married because i want to be with my husband forever!! i know with all my heart that there is a life after this and tho like most husbands he can be infuriating sometime, just like my kids, it would not change for a second the feelings that i want to share my life, after i die here, with them along with my parents and all my other family.

yes the sealing (perhaps u should look that word up in a dictionary to understand how much of a commitment it is compared to ur normal vows) is simple like everything in the temple. it is a sign of respect to God, the covenants (look that word up too) you make, with god and EACH OTHER, and the real significance of what u r actually doing. it is gods house, a sacred place and i for one would never want to be flashing cleavage or anything there. it is hard when u can't share that moment with all those that u want to, but u can the rest of the day-and make it just as special.

whatever u say, whether its about clothing, vows, or details u don't understand, to me it is more important to have that opportunity to be with my family for eternity than what anyone else has to say or thinks. if u knew these things to be true wouldn't u feel he same way?

if anyone wants i can go into your issues with polygamy? no matter what i say tho there will always be those who don't feel or see things the same way. this breaks mine and many others hearts because we know we have the most precious gift anyone can ever have, we want to share this because we know the things we have from this gospel to be true an correct through 100% experience-and where else do u gain knowledge but through your own experiences?! being part of this gives us a chance, not 100% guaranteed as we are human n make mistakes, bad choices, etc that put that chance in jeopardy-but i have always thought that to be my problem i need to work on. but i will do my best if it means a shot at staying with my family forever. what misery i would be in if i didn't have them. atleast i have support from my husband to help get me there.

perhaps after reading this u will go on as u have but perhaps it might just get u thinking a little more from someones point of view that feels differently and goes a little against the norm!

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Posted by: CA girl ( )
Date: February 02, 2011 08:11PM

You and your future spouse walk into what is called a Sealing room. These are pretty small - usually there is only room for about 35 people. These people all have to be adults who are worthy to hold a temple recommend. Children are not allowed. Adults need to prove their worthiness by passing an interview with a bishop saying they believe in Mormonism, don't drink or smoke, have paid 10 percent of their gross income to the Mormon church in the past year, haven't had sex outside of marriage, believe Thomas S. Monson is an actual prophet of God amongst other things. If you aren't a Mormon, even if you are a parent of the child getting married, you aren't allowed to attend the wedding. My friend was locked out of her son's wedding last summer because she doesn't believe in Mormonism any more and couldn't get a pass to go to the temple.

The couple kneel at the altar. There are no flowers to decorate, no music, no walking up the aisle, no dad giving the bride away etc. The couple just walks to the altar, kneels down, take hands across the altar and the "sealer" reads off the ceremony. You don't get to choose your own vows or say anything. Not even "I do". You only get to answer "Yes" at the appropriate places. Hopefully someone will post the transcript of the ceremony. Then you can stand up, walk away from the altar and exchange rings and a kiss. Then you stand at the door and shake hands and/or hug as your people leave the room.

Oh, and you have to wear a dress the temple considers modest - which means for the ceremony itself you often have to put in sleeves or raise the cleavage. You don't get to pick the veil you wear in the temple - you wear one they issue. Your husband has to wear a white suit and tie. No choice. Then before you go to the Sealing room, you have to put temple clothes over your wedding clothes. These include a green apron, white veil (women) or hat (men) a white sash and a white robe. You really can't see what the couple are wearing.

So it is actually a bit different than a regular wedding. Oh, and loving each other isn't one of the things that you promise in a temple wedding. Loyalty to the church is.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/02/2011 08:11PM by CA girl.

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Posted by: cl2 ( )
Date: February 02, 2011 08:33PM

You forgot the patriarchal grip is how you hold hands over the alter.

And you forgot that cute little hat the men get to wear!?!?

Two of the best parts of the wedding (tongue in cheek).

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Posted by: CA girl ( )
Date: February 02, 2011 08:45PM

So I contacted the google god

Patriarchal grip (Specific way you have to hold hands across the altar):

http://www.officialstreetpreachers.com/Mormonism/veil4.jpg

Men's Mormon Temple hat and general getup you cover wedding clothes with:

http://nowscape.com/mormon/images/You-Tube_Secret_Temple_Ceremonies.jpg

Better look at the hat:

http://xmo.lege.net/packham/m1-sign.jpg

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Posted by: cl2 ( )
Date: February 02, 2011 09:03PM

There really are no words are there!

I know a lot of women hated the veil and thought it was sexist--I hated the veil, but I'd rather wear the veil that that silly baker's hat.

I about burst out laughing when I saw my husband in it the first time. I cannot for the life of me imagine my dad in that hat. My dad was a john wayne type--ALL MAN.

(I looked at the pictures--just CREEPY isn't it!)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/02/2011 09:04PM by cl2.

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Posted by: loveskids ( )
Date: February 03, 2011 01:37AM

That's just what I thought when I looked over at dh on our wedding day and saw him in that silly hat. I immediately thought "my gosh! we are at a baker's convention."

I never could get serious about the temple and always hated to go.
Can you all believe we actually did all that weird stuff??

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Posted by: CA girl ( )
Date: February 03, 2011 07:46PM

He said more or less the same thing "I can't believe you did that Mom - That's so bizarre."

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Posted by: rain ( )
Date: February 03, 2011 08:08PM


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Posted by: Yorkie ( )
Date: February 02, 2011 08:28PM

I was always grateful we live in the UK, here we get to have a "proper" wedding first before the temple ceremony, because it is not legally recognised.

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Posted by: nwmcare ( )
Date: February 02, 2011 08:48PM

At a Catholic Church:

--Pews are decorated, there are flowers on the altar, attendants accompany the bride and groom into the church and so do the families! They even have special seating up front!

--Music is big: chamber choirs, an organist, solists, you name it, we Catholics have it. We may have bad art, but we have great music. The bride and groom decide, budget and hire.

--marriage preparation is required. A couple must be engaged for approximately 6 months and attend classes. They talk about things like family of origin, educational and career goals, handling finances, the number of children and when to have them. Seriously. These things matter.

--flowers, clothing and number of people in the ceremony depend on what the local or family custom is and what the bride and groom want;

--a Catholic marriage is sacramental. That means it is considered an encounter between the couple and Christ, and the couple confers it on each other. The priest is a witness only. For this reason the wedding must take place in a church and for this reason the Catholic church has never recognized marriages that take place in front of a judge (so shame on the Church for fighting gay marriage--it makes those who do hypocites with a capital H!);

--there can be a full one hour nuptial Mass with four scriptural readings (chosen by the couple) or a 1/2 hour service (for couples who are of different faiths or marrying at a time of year when a nuptial Mass is inappropriate) with 2 readings chosen by the couple;

--couples choose the scripture--from a set outline, but they may also choose a theme from which the priest speaks the homily (think sermon);

--couples also choose the vows they speak: within reason.

--the people who are bridesmaids or groomsmen do not have to be Catholic--only one 'witness' is necessary and as long as that one witness is a baptized Catholic, the rest of the wedding party can be made up of whomever is family or friend of the bride and groom;

--flowers and clothing are about custom and preference of the bridal couple. It should be pointed out thought, that nobody wants to see a bride who looks like a street corner working girl or a groom who looks like a pimp.

--all are welcome to witness the ceremony and help celebrate the union. And the celebrant (the priest or deacon) will almost always says so out loud, up front. This is a family, community happening. Smile! Raise a glass! Clap your hands! Have a good time!

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Posted by: NeverMo in CA ( )
Date: February 03, 2011 01:17AM

Sorry to be off-topic here, but "We [Catholics] may have bad art..."?

Um, ever visited the Vatican Museum? Sistine Chapel? The Uffizzi? Heard of Michelangelo or da Vinci? I'm not trying to be rude, but I don't get the bad Catholic art reference. A problem with sexual abuse coverups? Yes. Bad art? I don't see it. (Literally!)

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Posted by: Stormy ( )
Date: February 05, 2011 12:59AM

Absolutely on target except the bad art...some of the most beautiful art in the world is in the Vatican and many of the Cathedrals and there is some...not so much..

It's a joyous time for everyone...and yes alcohol is served at many Catholic receptions and yep...as said..the priest will drink along with the rest of us...

It's a real wedding for real people...with real flowers and food and the bride is always on that day beautiful...later on is later on.

My mo inlaws were very uncomfortable at our wedding...it was totally foreign to them...so was the reception...and so was my dress...vbg...and when they saw their RM drinking champagne well, that was a shock....hmmm guess they didn't know he drank...And they were the only mos there...everyone was very frinedly toward them...but them not so much...dancing at a reception...oh boy...all we needed to do was play poker and they would of have horrified...that we did when we went back to Utah...

I can see where I was a bad influence on him...but we had fun..

stormy

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Posted by: Summer ( )
Date: February 02, 2011 09:05PM

Here's a pic of the Draper, Utah temple sealing room:

http://brian.borups.org/blog/uploaded_images/orig_2_0031_30Dec08-734427.jpg

Search Google Images for "Mormon sealing room" or "Temple sealing room" to see more examples.

Here's a pic of exmormon Sandra Tanner modeling the temple garb for women. This would be worn over a modest wedding dress:

http://brian.borups.org/blog/uploaded_images/orig_2_0031_30Dec08-734427.jpg

And here's a pic of the men's temple garb:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_V3B2ABayOZM/SnWadoaFPCI/AAAAAAAAAaA/Oh5kpkGfMWQ/s400/Mormon+Temple+Robes!!.jpg

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Posted by: DebbiePA ( )
Date: February 02, 2011 09:56PM

In 1979, I got married in the Washington, D.C. temple.

In July, my daughter got married by a judge in the lodge of a ski resort. It was not a religious ceremony.

Since both my ex and I were converts, we had no family and no friends at the ceremony, which CA girl described perfectly above.

My daughter had a wedding that was so much more loving, joyful, and yes, spiritual than the pathetic excuse for a wedding ceremony that I had.

For my daughter, family was there. Mothers, fathers, grandparents, siblings, cousins, aunts, uncles, ...every family member that wanted to share the special day was there.

Friends were there. Friends from childhood, college, work, and even special friends of the parents. All there to celebrate.

All ages, all beliefs, all welcome.

Which do you think you'd prefer?

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Posted by: anon for this ( )
Date: February 02, 2011 10:08PM

Something about mine that still bothers me. Temple whites were not required for our guests. One wore a brown suit. I could not get it out of my mind how the non-LDS person I wanted to be there could not attend, while the "worthy" guests did not even have to dress in temple whites.

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Posted by: SusieQ#1 ( )
Date: February 02, 2011 11:08PM

It is just a short sealing ceremony performed with a small to large group (maybe 50) in attendance. It only takes about 15 to 30 minutes depending on how long the officiator rambles on. There are only a couple of sentences that actually complete the marriage.
I have often observed: married to each other? Where is the love.
It's an ordinance that is exactly the same for everyone. (See my post above.)

For those that lament not being there, really, you didn't miss anything! :-) The official part of the marriage contract is really... the paperwork.

For some the REAL party and celebration of the marriage is the reception. I've attended very simple ones to elaborate ones with a meal, DJ and dancing. (We did the latter with one of our daughters.)

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Posted by: Anon67 ( )
Date: February 02, 2011 11:42PM

Ah I see that the temple ceremony really isn't similar to a "traditional" wedding. It's more of a commitment to the church, right?
Slightly off topic, those hats remind me of when I used to work in a bakery, I had a very similar looking one, it was perhaps a bit taller.

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Posted by: anonners ( )
Date: February 03, 2011 12:45AM

If I ever do get married, it won't be in a church.

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Posted by: anon123 ( )
Date: February 03, 2011 01:40AM

+1

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Posted by: Anon67 ( )
Date: February 03, 2011 08:48AM

Same here! (If I ever marry I hope it will be in the grasses of Ireland and I'll be wearing purple)

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Posted by: anon123 ( )
Date: February 03, 2011 02:00PM

That sounds beautiful.

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Posted by: Hane ( )
Date: February 03, 2011 09:22AM

Maybe I'm just being mean, but do those shots of the interior of a temple (sealing room, celestial room) remind anyone else of a (monochromatic white) high-end funeral parlor's viewing room?

*runs and hides*

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Posted by: Adult of god ( )
Date: February 03, 2011 02:03PM

Plus, weddings are such a big deal these days, with all the wedding shows on cable tv with elaborate, exquisitly planned ceremonies and receptions, mormons girls must feel really left out.

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Posted by: Summer ( )
Date: February 03, 2011 07:51PM

The shape of the altar in the sealing room reminds me of a coffin. Which would make the symbolism of a temple marriage really, really strange.

"Brother M. and Sister Nervous, will you please take your places and kneel opposite each other at the coffin."

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Posted by: cludgie ( )
Date: February 03, 2011 07:23PM

I have two married kids. First married kid gets married in SLC temple, one of several dozen on that day. We reserve one of the larger rooms, seats about 20 people. Only DW and I and RM son are present; all others--siblings, cousins, nieces and nephews--wait outside. I climb up into the witness seat, and officiator begins to mumble. Sounds like, "Rhubarb, rhubarb, rhubarb Lord. Take each other in patriarhubarical acoss rhubarb, mumble. Pause. Rhubarb-rhubarb *raises voice* holy order of the Melchizedek Priesthood... mumble rhubarb." Takes about five minutes. People stand, smile weakly at each other. Ancient officiator is deadpan, looking like he needs to go pee. I sign a paper giving up my daughter to some guy. (I do like him, though, and have since learnt his name.)

Second married kid, my RM son: He has left the church and fallen in love with a brilliant never-Mo PhD candidate from UofU. They choose to get married in the gardens of La Caille in SLC. DW and I fly in from Africa. Whole damn extended family present, including my little grandkids. My twin sons get to stand in with Best Man. Non-Mo parents of the bride walk her down the hill to the justice of the peace. Pictures are take during the ceremony, me with them, them with me, brothers with them, sisters with them, her siblings with them both sets of parents. We retire to the restaurant inside. My son and bride share champagne toasts (to the consternation of still-active DW and daughters), we toast, we smile, there are tears and more pictures. Takes hours. We go home and sleep a long time.

I leave it to you. Which one is better wedding, Natasha?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/03/2011 07:43PM by cludgie.

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Posted by: topojoejoe ( )
Date: February 03, 2011 07:42PM

Where to start... okay here it is:

first, it takes no more than 5 minutes, no one you want to be there, is there, you are 'sealed' not married to your spouse by a complete stranger that both of you never met.

You never actually take any vows with your spouse even when you make commitments because you never actually say each other's names, since your earthly given names are not actually your real names (in mormondom).

If you are female you will wear something that covers you from head to toe so forget your beautiful dress, if you are male, you will be dressed like the pillberry dough boy.

The only commitment you will make will be to live the eternal principle, meaning: you vow that you will practice poligamy in the eternities so that you can procreate the rest of your life with (if you are a man) as many wifes as possible to replenish worlds that you will create with your spouses. And if you are a woman, you will bear children for the eterneties and share that joy with as many wifes as your husband can handle.

Does that seem like anything you would do in a normal marriage/wedding ceremony??

I hope I have answered your question.

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Posted by: brigantia ( )
Date: February 04, 2011 03:21PM

My kids were all civilly married in fabulous surroundings and all inclusive receptions - a really good party in each case. The last daughter was married on the island of Crete. We had Greek music, dancing and another lovely party.

We attended a mormon wedding (niece) in the stake house. It was soulless but I'm sure they were happy. We had standard mormon wedding fare in the cultural hall before the couple disappeared to the temple for the sealing. Later they joined family and friends at the private evening reception away from all churchy stuff. A bar was available for non-members (most of the guests).

I know which I prefer.

Briggy

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